One Team, One Goal: Student Success!

Music Department

Sight-reading and Performances

Sight-reading

Sight-reading ability is a skill that continually results in greater musicianship and level of performance. Each school is expected to have or to acquire materials emphasizing music reading to improve sight-reading and music reading skills.

Concerts

Concert performances should be a result of instruction in performance classes; therefore, the frequency of performances will vary according to the ability of the performing ensemble. Too many performances will deprive the students of basic instruction; too few will deprive them of the opportunity to put that knowledge to use.

In scheduling evening performances, avoid conflicts with concerts in schools sharing your same attendance area (feeder pattern). Such a conflict forces families with two or more children involved to choose which program to attend. It is also an indication of a lack of communication between the teachers involved, and a lack of support of programs in other schools. It is suggested that feeder pattern and area schools communicate in the spring planning meetings regarding setting dates for the next school year.

Elementary, Middle, and High School music teachers are encouraged to organize and participate in joint endeavors (concerts, programs, and activities) to develop continuity and unity in each school community.

Dates of performances, extra rehearsals, out-of-school activities, etc. should be given to parents in writing well in advance of the event. Additionally, the Music Office should be informed of ALL performances, activities and trips. This information should be made available for the monthly Music Activities Calendar prior to the 15th of every month.

Performances are extra-curricular while classes and outside rehearsals, like lab periods, are curricular. This being the case, grades may not be lowered or withheld for a student who misses a performance. There are other penalties however, and a student who is unable to attend performances should be instructed on his level in a class which has few, if any, performance obligations.