Categories

Projects for each category must be unique and cannot be entered in more than one category. Students may participate in 1 project, excluding the Technology Literacy Challenge. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings - based on the member in the highest grade level. Projects are to be designed and created by students. Some adult guidance is allowed, but it must be clear that all work entered by students was done by the students. A document will be filled out by students which will answer a few questions for the judges and will cite non-student produced material used in the project.

3D Modeling | Rubric

This category is defined as any original artwork digitally created and modeled in three dimensions using specialized software. Software may include, but not be limited to, Maya, AutoCad, Sketch Up, GollyGee Blocks, and Light Wave. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Animation | Rubric

This category is defined as an original design with the primary purpose for allowing for the motion of objects. Software may include, but not be limited to Adobe Flash, KidPix, etc. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Audio Production | Rubric

This category is defined as any original audio production that has been edited/produced with digital software. Projects may include speaking, singing, music, sounds effects, and other audio components. Software may include, but are not be limited to - Audacity, Garage Band, Wavosaur, etc. The project must be displayed on a computer in the program in which it was created. The student should be prepared to demonstrate to judges how the software was used to create the finished project. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the category rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Device Modification | Rubric

This category is for devices engineered and/or modified by students to serve a specific purpose or meet a specific goal. Device and parts do not have to be new. However, the device must be fully functional. Some examples include, but are not limited to: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Makey Makey projects. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Digital Photo Production | Rubric

This category is defined as any computer created original project using original student photographs. The project must be displayed on a computer in the program in which it was created. The student should be prepared to demonstrate to judges how the software was used to create the finished project. A hard copy of the finished project may be displayed but is not required. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Digital Game Design | Rubric

Digital Game Design should include original content, design, and rules of an interactive game. Students may use the software program of their choice in order to demonstrate creativity, originality, organization, and interactivity. Students should be able to explain to judges what inspired their game idea and how they programmed their game to achieve project goals. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries.

Graphic Design | Rubric

This category is defined as any student created, computer-generated, non-animated graphic design project. Digital Photography and 3D Modeling are NOT part of this category. The student(s) must be able to display the content from the source project files using the program it was created in. Software may include, but not be limited to, Paint, KidPix, Photoshop, Corel Draw, Illustrator, or Free Hand. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Internet Application | Rubric

Projects in this category have strength in their use on networks, either the World Wide Web or LANs (Local Area Networks). Examples of Internet application projects include web pages, web sites, chat rooms, interactive games, bulletin boards, podcasts and blogs. Your computer is required to display this project. Internet access will not be guaranteed at the fair. All links must be captured one level deep. No tri-board displays. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Mobile Apps | Rubric

An entry in this category is an app that is specifically developed for a mobile device (phone, tablet, smart-device, etc.). This app can be developed for any operating system (Android, iOS, Windows Mobile, etc.) as long as the student has a device or simulator that can run the app on the day of the fair. (This category does not include mobile-friendly web pages - please see the Internet Applications category). Pre-planning documentation materials such as a storyboard and a flowchart are required. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries.

Multimedia Applications | Rubric

Multimedia projects are defined as computer-based reports or creative presentations using any combination of sound and/or images with text. Possible software used for projects in this category include but are not limited to: PowerPoint, KidPix, AppleWorks, Astound, Storybook Weaver and HyperStudio. If appropriate to the project, a storyboard may be displayed to show sequencing of project creation. Videos do not go in this category. Any hyperlinks need to be captured one level deep since Internet access will not be guaranteed. No tri-boards are allowed. The computer is required to display the project. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Productivity Applications | Rubric

This category is defined as any student created, computer-generated project that uses desktop publishing or general productivity software. Entries can be developed from various non-multimedia application programs such as word processing, spreadsheets, databases or any other non-multimedia software. This category includes, but is not limited to, desktop publishing projects. Hard copies of projects may be displayed at original size to show the judges, but no large displays are allowed, including tri-board displays. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Project Programming | Rubric

Projects in this category are self-executing programs created using recognizable programming languages such as BASIC, C++, Pascal, LOGO, etc. All parts of the program must be the author’s own design. Programs must be identifiable in one of the three following categories:

  • Computer-aided instruction or educational/learning games.
  • Business or commercial applications.
  • Personal applications that, with minor alterations, could be marketed for larger commercial audiences.
  • You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Robotics | Rubric

Projects may be constructed from kits or published drawings, modified from other devices to create new applications, or constructed from the student's own concepts and designs. All entries must be a working and functional piece of electro-mechanical hardware in which movement and intent is controlled through student created programming. Examples of commercially available kits are robotic “arms” or robot movers, Lego and K'Nex style building kits, Capsella, VEX, and Technics style robotics kits. Devices controlled through direct, real time remote control by the student are not appropriate (ie: remote controlled cars). Once started, the robotics project should operate as a standalone independent machine without human interaction. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length or complexity of the project, the judge time slots are 15 minutes in length. Judges may view only a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Tech Literacy Challenge

An online exam (optional) will be given on-site for each of the grade level categories. This exam is for individuals only. The exam will have 50 multiple-choice questions. Questions will be vocabulary and concept oriented. They will come from the following topic areas:

  1. History of computers
  2. Parts of the computer
  3. Peripheral computer devices
  4. Uses and limitations of computers
  5. General uses of common computer applications software
  6. New and emerging technologies
  7. The Internet
  8. Social implications of computers
  9. General programming (Level III, Grades 9-12, only)
  • Questions for the Technology Literacy Challenge will come from information generally available in textbooks and reliable sources on the Internet. A suggested list of resources is available on the State Tech Fair web site. Computer magazines and television programs have discussed some of the social implications of computers. An oral exam may be used as a tie-breaker of three or more students.

Video Production | Rubric

This category is defined as any original video project that has been edited on a computer with digital video editing software and exported into a digital video format. The project must be displayed for viewing on a computer. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries. Judges may view only a portion of the actual project during this time. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

Registration

Registration has closed. Fees must be postmarked by December 16, 2016.

Here are some things you will want to know about registration:

  • All students in grades 3-12 may participate in the fair. This includes all public, private and home-schooled students in Cobb County.
  • An adult representative must register all students.
  • Teams are restricted to a maximum of 2 participants.
  • Students register by their current grade level and may enter a maximum of one category.
  • Students entering as a team must compete at the grade level of the oldest member of the team.
  • All categories are open to team competition unless it is specifically stated the category is for individuals.

Grade level divisions for all categories, are as follows:

  • Grades 3-4
  • Grades 5-6
  • Grades 7-8
  • Grades 9-10
  • Grades 11-12

Registration Fee:

The non-refundable registration fee for each student is $10. If a team submits an entry, each team member must pay the $10 fee.

Make $10 check or Money Order to Cobb County School District.
Due: Post Marked by December 16, 2016

  • Mail to:
  • Attention: Nancy Ranasinghe
  • Sedalia Park Elementary
  • 2230 Lower Roswell Road
  • Marietta, Ga 30068

Students

Setup

Depending on the project, students will not have access to the judging room prior to judging. If parental help is needed, the parents are ONLY allowed to assist students in carrying in equipment to the judging area and must immediately return to the waiting area.

Parents MUST leave the judging area and allow the students to set up their projects. If the student needs set up time (I.E. Robotics or case modification), please notify the director to make arrangements.

ONLY students, judges, and staff are allowed in the judging areas.

Presentation times are determined at the time participants arrive and check-in. Judging begins at 9:00 am.

Tables will be provided by the host. All equipment needed, such as computers, monitors, cables, multi-outlet power strips, etc. must be provided by the participants. No projection devices may be used. All software used in the project must be pre-loaded on the computers.

Students and schools are responsible for the safety and security of their equipment and software, not the fair host. Anyone engaging in actions that could be harmful to another participant’s project will be disqualified.

Participants MUST provide computers for projects.

Note: No tri-boards or large displays are allowed.

Links and Info

State Tech Fair

Judging

If you are volunteering to be a judge, please be sure you are available both January 21 and 28, in case we have inclement weather. If schools activities are cancelled for Saturday, January 21, we will move the event to January 28.

General Information

Note to judges: The 2016 Competition will be held on January 21, 2017 at Wheeler High School, Marietta, Georgia.

IMPORTANT: All prospective judges MUST read the rules and procedures of judging for the Tech Competition.

All projects will be judged by the following:

  • Originality—Was the entry original, creative, and imaginative in content and implementation?
  • Clarity—Was the student presentation to the judge clear? (Nervousness will not count against the student)
  • Documentation—Did the student recieve and document all required permissions?
  • Appropriateness—Was the technology/software used appropriately matched?
  • Design—Does the overall design support the project purpose?

At the time of the judging, students will be required to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the software as it relates to the project.
  2. Explain the various aspects of the creation of the project.
  3. Defend their choice of software for the project.
  4. Answer judges' questions about the project.

Judge periods are 15 minutes for ALL categories. To allow time for judges to fill out the Student Feedback form, students should be prepared to explain and demonstrate the highlights of their project in no more than 15 minutes.

Projects are evaluated by the judges to determine the best project in that category. The judges use several instruments for making their evaluation. Judges will provide each student with a feedback form listing strengths, weaknesses, and suggestions for each project. Actual scoring materials will NOT be released.

Go to the Categories page to read the descriptions of the categories and download rubrics that can be used to find strength and weaknesses of a project. Judges will NOT base final scores solely on these rubrics. They are guidelines only.

Rules and Procedures

Please read carefully through the information below to familiarize yourself with the rules and procedures of the Tech Competition. Even if you have judged before, it is important for you to review these pages to brush up on any new rules or procedures for this year.

All judges decisions are final

When and Where?

The 2016 Technology Fair will be held on Saturday, Januray 21, 2017. The location will be at Wheeler HS, Marietta, Ga.

Contentintal breakfast is provided by the Tech Competition.

Schedule

  • 7:30-7:50 Judge Checkin and Continental Breakfast
  • 8:15 Mandatory judge orientation meeting
  • 9:00 Judging begins

Check In

You will choose your category and grade level when you check in. Assignments are first come/first served. To prevent open judge slots, we adopted the onsite assignment method now used. At this time, you will receive your list of judging assignments for the day. You should peruse the Categories pages and look at the Rubric Guidelines found there to familiarize yourself with the descriptions and assessment guidelines for each category.

JUDGING

Promptly at 9:00 am, judging starts. You have a strict 15 minute window to judge a project. A new judging slot opens every 20 minutes. Judging will continue until all entries are judged in the category.

Judges do not have to stay once they are done withtheir category; however, judges are welcome to stay for the awards ceremony.

FINISH TIME

Your last judge slot is determined by the number of projects that your judge team will judge. Some teams are finished around lunch time and others have a full schedule.

HOW TO JUDGE PROJECTS

You and any other judges that you will be working with will receive all materials that you will need to complete your judging assignment. You will have information on each project, a rubric guideline sheet for each project on which to keep notes, and a student feedback sheet. You will keep all assessment materials until you have seen ALL projects in a grade/category. After seeing all projects in a given grade/category group, you and any other judge on your team will rank the first, second, and third place projects according to your interview and project assessment.

RESULTS

As you complete the judging and ranking of a grade/category, you will submit your first, second, and third place results on the results Form to the Results Manager in the Judge's Room. Ties are NOT allowed, so you must rank the top three projects separately. The Results Manager will go over your results with you and any members of your team to check for discrepencies or problems with the results. Once cleared from the Results area, you will continue on to judge your next grade/category or be checked out upon completion of all judging assignments.

Sponsors and Donors

The Cobb Regional Technology Competition is a platform for students in grades 3-12 to share their digital talents and compete in an environment that encourages their creativity. The event is open to Cobb County School District, Marietta City, Private and Home School students in Cobb County. The competition will be held at Wheeler High School on January 21, 2017 (inclement weather date is January 28).

This opportunity cannot happen without the support of our community! We are seeking financial donations and volunteers who are willing to give a Saturday as a judge to encourage those students who will lead our future. We are all-volunteer, and are not-for-profit. All donations are tax deductible (made payable to Cobb County School District). We can’t do it without you! Please consider supporting these amazing students. You complete the judging and ranking of a grade/category, you will submit your first, second, and third place results on the results Form to the Results Manager in the Judge's Room. Ties are NOT allowed, so you must rank the top three projects separately. The Results Manager will go over your results with you and any members of your team to check for discrepencies or problems with the results. Once cleared from the Results area, you will continue on to judge your next grade/category or be checked out upon completion of all judging assignments.

How does your donation help?

  • Facility use of Wheeler High School, which includes a teacher supervising the event and a custodian
  • Medals, Ribbons and certificates
  • Cost of flyers, signage and other promotional items
  • Continental Breakfast and snacks for judges
  • ... and more

Make check or Money Order to Cobb County School District.

  • Mail to:
  • Attention: Nancy Ranasinghe
  • Sedalia Park Elementary
  • 2230 Lower Roswell Road
  • Marietta, Ga 30068

All sponsors will have their company recognized at the event on a sponsor banner.

If you are volunteering to be a judge, please be sure you are available both January 21 and 28, in case we have inclement weather. If schools activities are cancelled for Saturday, January 21, we will move the event to January 28.

Quick Information

Here are a few items to answer basic questions about the Cobb Regional Technology Competition:

  • Date of Competition: January 21, 2017
  • Inclement weather date: January 28, 2017
  • Location: Wheeler High School | 375 Holt Road NE, Marietta, Ga
  • Registration: Must be completed online by parent or guardian
  • Students register by their current grade level and may enter a maximum of one category.
  • Registration Fee: Must be postmarked by December 16, 2016. Write CRTC and child's name on the "for" line.
  • Mail non-refundable Registration Fee ($10.00) Mail to:
    • Attention: Nancy Ranasinghe
    • Sedalia Park Elementary
    • 2230 Lower Roswell Road
    • Marietta, Ga 30068
  • If you are working with a partner, the grade level grouping will be determined by the oldest member (e.g. a 5th & 3rd grader woking together will be in the 5, 6 category).
  • Internet is not guaranteed. Please visit FAQ section for more information
  • All Judges Decisions are Final
  • Cobb Regional Technology Conference Flyer (PDF)
  • Sign up for text message updates. Text @crtc1617 to the number: 81010. Tap here with your mobile device.

Directions

Wheeler HS | 375 Holt Road NE, Marietta, Ga